Building a blue carbon economy for Aquaculture

A Greener Blue

An activator developing an evidence-backed, place-based,  market-driven and fisher people-led model to align the seafood sector on a common framework, not in ten years, but today.

ASSESSING THE CURRENT LANDSCAPE

A Greener Blue (AGB) is a food systems solution activator focused on rapid mobilzation to build tools that support a better aquaculture. The work is led by The Lexicon, with support from Food at Google.

Consumers are turning away from beef toward alternative protein sources like seafood to mitigate the impact their diets have on climate change.

Conservation groups are restoring and maintaining seagrasses, mangroves, and macroalgae, effectively storing atmospheric carbon at rates 20 times more effective than our world’s forests.

Entrepreneurs have begun farming carbon-capturing seaweed for a range of uses, from animal feed supplements to bioplastics.

Fisher Peoples are creating unique entrepreneurial approaches like integrated aquaculture systems to sustain and improve their livelihoods while preserving the health of ocean ecosystems.

The one thing these groundbreaking technologies, conservation efforts and innovative approaches have in common? They’re all part of the emerging blue carbon movement, all happening underwater, and all connected to market-driven entrepreneurial efforts.

We’re developing a digital platform for aquaculture producers.

Domain experts from across the global value chain have gathered to collaborate on a new open source platform that captures the sustainable production practices and ecosystem benefits provided by seaweed, shrimp, shellfish and finfish producers across the globe.

AGB: ALIGNING ON SHARED OBJECTIVES

For its work in aquaculture, AGB has gathered industry stakeholders across the value chain in the areas of seaweed, finfish, shrimp, and shellfish. Their shared objective is to develop a single respected, validated, and imminently useful digital platform to describe best practices for aquaculture, followed by fisheries.

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Evidence-backed
Evidence-backed

Science (and experience) matter. The initiative will draw on research and domain expertise among producers to describe what aquaculture systems should look like based on a series of outcomes or ecosystem benefits. Expanding from a shared definition, the group will identify the principles and practices that directly enable those outcomes.

Place-based
Place-based

Place matters. While the guiding principles of sustainable aquaculture are universally understood, their application is place-based, a response to a variety of factors and informed by water conditions, weather, geography, species types, available technologies, feed sources, traditions, and community values. Appropriate scale … that scales appropriately.

Market-driven
Market-driven

An informed purchaser matters. Consumers and producers want to know who makes their food, where it’s grown, and what practices are used. That’s why we believe in food systems models with short supply chains that maintain the identity of their ingredients. Aligning producers and purchasers can conserve threatened ecosystems, mitigate climate impacts, and regenerate coastal communities.

Fisher People Led
Fisher People Led

Just as a dairy farmer straps on their boots every morning and greets their cows, so too does the seafood farmer. They step into their waders and harvest sugar kelp, check on oysters after a storm, or make sure the trout look happy and healthy. But aquaculture does not stop there. It is an ecosystem of truck drivers and fish mongers, distributors and investors, engineers and academics, policy makers and communities. The Greener Blue Activator accounts for every step, every actor, that brings us our seafood and new innovations for a better planet.

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Ten Guiding Principles for Aquaculture

To increase sustainability, responsibility, and opportunity in our aquaculture system, the Greener Blue team has identified a set of principles that support climate and ecosystem friendly farming methods, responsible businesses, and local communities.

A sector by sector approach

More than half of the fish and seafood we eat today has been grown by farmers, and the sector is growing rapidly to meet global demands for protein.

Depending on the specific needs of the animals or algae being grown, the methods of aquaculture vary widely, taking place in tanks or artificial ponds on land, in the natural environment, or a combination of the two.

Connected Markets: Aquaculture Tool

In a connected market, food purchasers learn to ask the right questions in sourcing ingredients so they can champion a food system aligned with their personal values and the missions of their companies – even when these ingredients come from halfway around the world. And by becoming a partner in this mutually beneficial value chain, producers are also incentivized to deliver high quality goods at a fair price that support their communities and the marketplace.

Foodicons: creating a universal language for seafood
Foodicons: creating
a universal language for seafood

More than half of the fish and seafood we eat today has been grown by farmers, and the sector is growing rapidly to meet global demands for protein.

Depending on the specific needs of the animals or algae being grown, the methods of aquaculture vary widely, taking place in tanks or artificial ponds on land, in the natural environment, or a combination of the two.